Flores Agreement 72 Hours

The FSA`s main protection, codified in two laws, the Homeland Security Act (HSA) and the William Wilberforce Human Rights Protection Act (TVPRA), limits the time of detention of CIAs. Under current law, DHS can only hold CIAs for 72 hours. After this period, DHS sends UIC to the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR), which is part of the Department of Health and Human Services. According to TVPRA, codified as 8 U.S.C§ 1232(c)(2), a UAC must be placed “immediately within the least restrictive framework in the best interests of the child.” In 2015, Judge Dolly Gee of the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California accepted the government`s request to give ORR 20 days to house a child (Final Rule at p. 44410). Under the agreement, INS is required to bring minors into the least restrictive environment corresponding to the age and specific needs of the child, including rights, safety and sanitation, toilets and sinks, drinking water and food, medical assistance, temperature control, surveillance and contact with family members. A new plan calls for the release of parents and their children after no more than 72 hours. Researchers say children may experience symptoms of trauma after spending a long time in detention. Immigration attorney Rose Thompson has seen several asylum seekers spend more than 72 hours in CBP detention, including one case where a mother and her adult daughter spent 12 days in CBP detention. The Flores colony developed through several administrations.

It originated during the Reagan administration of 1985, when the ACLU was brought to justice on behalf of Jenny Flores, a 15-year-old girl who fled the civil war in El Salvador. Her relentless treatment included a striped search during which she was locked up for months in a youth institution with no education, rest or other support pending her deportation. Until 1992, the Supreme Court accepted the arguments of the George H. W. Bush administration at the time that its treatment had not violated due process rights, and the court referred the case to the lower courts of California (where the case originated the case). . . .